Do Genetics Matter?

Earlier this year, a recent advance in stem cell research got a lot of media attention. Researchers at Cambridge University and the Weizmann Institute in Israel were able to program stem cells to become primordial germ cells, the precursors to eggs and sperm. Scientists have been able to create viable baby mice from these cells, and with further study, viable human eggs and sperm may someday be created using stem cells from any human’s skin sample. I think this type of science has tremendous potential to assist male and female individuals suffering from various forms of infertility. However, more public interest seemed to come from the idea that someday same-sex couples may be able to contribute both egg and sperm to create children that are genetically related to both partners.

Reading about this future possibility got me thinking. We are a full house of six and won’t likely be having more children, but if this technology was available when we were going through surrogacy, would we have been interested in having children conceived with egg and sperm from Josh and me? How much do genetics really matter to us?

For us, how our children may be related to us genetically mattered some, but less than and in different ways than people may think. Josh and I are both reasonably proud people with good self esteem, but neither of us have a great desire to create “mini-me” children that carry all our traits and looks. In our initial conversations about becoming parents, adopting children that had no genetic relationship to either of us would have been a serious consideration, but it was not possible in Florida at that time. A surrogacy process where one of us contributed sperm to create children had some legal and social benefits that made it the way to go.

Living in South Florida, we have enjoyed our island of progressive blue in an often red state. We have been acutely aware that much of Florida subscribes to the Deep South mentality. Because of the hostile stance that the Florida state government had toward same-sex parents, we felt that at least one of us having a biological link to each of our children afforded some protection from the nightmare scenario of the state considering us “illegitimate, unfit parents” and trying to take our children away. As an interracial couple, we thought having children with both Caucasian and Asian features meant that if ever one of us was travelling with small babies alone, strangers would be more likely to accept either of us as related to these children. A man alone with small children and no mom in sight still raises eyebrows, and if the kids are clearly not biologically related to the man, some may even jump to conclusions that something inappropriate is taking place.

Thus we set out to have biracial kids. The other half of this genetic equation in current assisted reproductive technology comes from an egg donor. We decided to keep the identity of the egg donor completely secret, because if family or friends knew anything about the background of the egg donor, they could in turn infer which one of us was the sperm donor. The only people who know the genetic details of our family are the ones intimately involved in the process and the kids’ ongoing health. We know, the surrogates know, the lawyers and doctors know. Our families may have thoughts, but their theories have never been confirmed, and this reasonable doubt helps for us to both be treated equally as parents. When the kids are old enough to understand where babies come from (AJ and JJ are fast approaching that day), they will be the first to know about their genetic origins.

When we were considering a second surrogacy process a few years ago, we were presented with the opportunity for the person not genetically involved the first time around to make a contribution. But this was not our primary motivation for considering more children. We wanted AJ and JJ to have little siblings to teach them about responsibility, and help them understand that they are not the center of the universe. We knew that if we were blessed with a girl like DJ, it would bring more balance to our household than thoughts of genetics ever would.

Looking back, Josh and I have learned that genetics may matter for external situations, but within our family, it actually matters very little. Josh and I both love all our children equally no matter the biology. We have proven it to ourselves in a manner that is nearly scientific.


Fall Fun

We have spent the last few weeks enjoying the season.  AJ and JJ decided on Harry Potter themed costumes this year.  Last week we went to New Orleans to visit my sister and brother in law.  They are always so great with the kids.  I know they will make great parents.  I’m thrilled to announce that they are expecting a bouncing baby boy due next year!

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Some Friends Fade, But Family is Forever



To excited first time parents to be, I would offer encouragement and well wishes, but a bit of sobering advice as well: Be prepared to lose some friends.  Most experienced parents know of this phenomenon, but for a couple reasons that I will go into below, I think this effect is felt even more acutely by gay parents.

Fact: I have lost more friends becoming a gay parent than I have coming out as gay in the first place.  I have always been a bit of a nerd and thus in grade school I wasn’t a popular kid, but I mingled with a group of similarly studious friends.  Two of my best friends, “Rich” and “Nick” remained tight with me even though we all went to different colleges.  When I came out of the closet in college, I was pleased that both of them were accepting of me and remained close friends well into adulthood.  Rich and Nick were in turn friendly when I introduced them to Josh.  Even though the three of us lived in different places, when we visited we would all hang out together like old times.  Nick would share about his girlfriend problems, and Rich invited Josh and me to celebrate his engagement and his wedding to his wife.  It was around this time of transitioning to a different phase of adulthood that Josh and I started talking about having children in earnest.  Just like Rich and Nick shared their major life events with us, Josh and I were excited to share about this endeavor with them.  Rich was clearly in a happy place in his life and was happy for us when we shared the news.  I distinctly remember calling Nick to giddily tell him about how Josh and I were going to California to look into gestational surrogacy and become parents.  My heart sank when he responded by saying, “Why are you telling me this?” In further discussion it became clear that Nick did not understand why we would ever want to have to children, and that he was not particularly happy for us.  I ended the rapidly deteriorating conversation and hung up the phone before it became an argument.  We exchanged superficial pleasantries at Rich’s wedding, and then we did not speak for about two years.  Around the time that we were planning AJ and JJ’s first birthday party, I received an email from Nick.  He was attempting to strike up a conversation and asked the question,  “What ever happened between us?” as if he was oblivious to how my feelings were deeply hurt.  I responded angrily that he knew very well what happened, and he again responded, this time stating openly what I knew to be the truth all along: He disagreed with the idea of two men raising children and felt it would adversely affect children to be raised in a non-traditional household.  In retrospect I feel that Nick was perfectly fine with the novelty of having gay friends that hung out in gay bars doing stereotypically gay things, but as soon as his gay friends decided to be real people and live their lives outside of a socially acceptable second class box, he became disapproving.

After AJ and JJ were born, many good friends, most of them gay, faded away more slowly.  In our first few years living in Florida, Josh and I had amassed a large group of gay friends.  Most of them had no interest in having children, but they were all very happy for us all the same when we announced that we were expecting.  We invited them all to a baby shower shortly before AJ and JJ were born and the party was very well attended.  After AJ and JJ were born, I appreciated that these friends continued to invite us to go out at night to the bars or have wine tasting parties in their homes.  Because we were busy with twin babies, we would either pass or try to send one of us out to have fun while the other stayed home with the kids.  Inevitably, the invitations became fewer and far between.  Unlike Nick, there have been no hard feelings involved, so I don’t fault these friends in the slightest.  Our unusual situation as gay guys with kids just didn’t fit into their social calendars neatly.  That’s okay.

Losing so many friends over the years both gay and straight, either suddenly or slowly over the years, I have only a touch of sadness.  In place of these friends, I have a large beautiful family.  These four children bring me unlimited and enduring joy and fulfillment.  We are beginning to make a few new friends as well. They are usually fellow parents, and often happen to be gay dads themselves, who seem to be more understanding of our priorities.  Reaching out online we have found some groups of like minded gay parents like the Handsome Father and Gays With Kids.  These groups do amazing and much needed work connecting gay dads around the country and offering support for our special family situation.

Everything I really need in life is right here.

Everything I really need in life is right here.

L’shanah Tovah!

This evening we celebrated the beginning of the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah.  Josh’s parents came over and we sang the blessings before having a meal including apples dipped in honey for a sweet year.  I am proud to have mastered brisket recipe shared from a coworker.  AJ and JJ loved the brisket so much they asked for second and third helpings until it was completely devoured!

A Chinese man made this brisket and the Jewish side of the family endorses it as legit

A Chinese man made this brisket and the Jewish side of the family endorses it as legit

In other news, AJ and JJ have started third grade.  They are matched with two teachers that work as a team this year.  One teacher focuses on math, the other focuses on reading and writing.  They swap classes in the afternoon, so AJ and JJ are working on the same things with the same teachers while separated through the course of the day.  A wonderful benefit from this arrangement is that the boys have the same homework sent home each day.  This is much less confusing for Josh and I to supervise, and all we have to do is make sure they don’t cheat off each other’s work.  The school year seems to have gotten off to a sweet start!

1st day of 3rd grade. Yes, AJ is wearing a pepperoni pizza backpack

1st day of 3rd grade. Yes, AJ is wearing a pepperoni pizza backpack

About MJ and DJ

MJ and DJ are our second set of twins born through surrogacy.  A few years ago Josh and I started talking about the idea of having more children.  We thought it would be nice to have a girl to break up all the testosterone in the house, and it would also be an opportunity for the non-donor partner from our last surrogacy experience to make a genetic contribution to our family.  Because of the economy and our finances at the time, international surrogacy seemed the way to go this time around.  We researched our options and decided to look into an agency and a clinic operating in India.

The next step in our plan was to travel to Mumbai, India to see for ourselves.  We visited the clinic and were presented with some options for prospective surrogates.  We personally met and chose to work with Pavitra because she was experienced having served as a surrogate previously.  Regardless of language barrier, we knew that Pavitra understood exactly what kind of process she was getting involved with because she had done it once before.  We knew that we would not have the close relationship with Pavitra like we did with our first surrogate, but the financial benefit for Pavitra and her family in India’s economy would be life changing.  The beaming smile on Pavitra’s face when she learned we had chosen her told us everything we needed to know.

When we did IVF in India, we asked for the doctor to transfer two embryos instead of the standard three because we were trying to aim for a singleton.  As fate would have it, two embryos implanted anyway and we had a second set of twins on our hands!  Because of laws against sex selection in India, we did not know the if we had boys, girls or both until their birth.  Baby girl DJ was delivered first via c-section and baby boy MJ arrived moments later.  MJ and DJ were born during a period of change in the surrogacy industry of India, and this complicated and prolonged the process that ultimately allowed MJ and DJ to come home to the US one month after their birth.  After we left, the door seems to have slammed shut for gay couples seeking surrogacy in India.  Thailand and Nepal have followed suit in the years since, and we do not recommend international surrogacy at this time.

MJ has a name that is the masculinization of Josh’s grandmother that died a few years before.  DJ is named after a pop culture icon.  It is a name I have been saving for my daughter since before AJ and JJ were born!  DJ is a bit of a fashionista.  She insists on choosing her own outfits out of the closet proclaiming them to be “cute!”  She is partial to clothes with her favorite characters Minnie Mouse and Hello Kitty.  MJ has a voice that carries and honestly was singing before he could talk.  He started out with “ABC” and “Twinkle Twinkle” but has begun to branch out into singing along to pop tunes on the car radio.

Baby girl DJ on the left and baby boy MJ on the right shortly after their birth

DJ and MJ shortly after their birth

2nd Birthday cupcakes

2nd Birthday cupcakes